Homemade Flavored Salts

Homemade Flavored Finishing Salts - Perfect for holiday gifts!

HoHoHo! It’s the holidays and if you’re a friend of mine expect food gifts. I don’t care if you hate to eat, I’m still spending countless hours in the kitchen to make something gorgeously delicious to show you how much I love you. If you’re on my naughty list, you get plain old cookies but if you on the nice list I’ll dive a little deeper into my arsenal and pull out something like these beauties.

Flavored salts are my absolute favorite way to boost the flavor of a dish. I have all types of salts from all ends of the earth but these homemade flavored ones are the most fun to use. Flavored/infused salts are really easy to make. Simply mix salt with whatever flavor you choose in a food processor or by hand and let the mixture dry before packaging. Salt is a natural preserver, as long as your combination is dried completely before packaging they can be used indefinitely. Use on meats, poultry, vegetables, cheese, and even chocolate. Picture it, srirracha lime salt on French fries, wild mushroom salt on a buttered pasta, and herb citrus salt on chicken and fish — seriously awesome.

salt rosemary

Like I said, they’re really simple to make and are perfect gifts. Here, I have three recipes that show different techniques; reduction, dry, and wet. The flavor possibilities are endless, so be as creative as you’d like. Using a food processor is optimal but not necessary. I like to use a food processor because it cuts the flavors into the salt giving it a deeper flavor but you can still make a great salt without it. When you’re done, pour into a beautiful jar or tin to give to someone who deserves it — and make sure to keep some for yourself.

type of salt to use

Coarse salt, like coarse sea salt, kosher, and Maldon are preferred.

wine reduction

  
salt red wine

reduction method
This is a technique using liquid and reducing it to a syrup, making the flavors more intense and increase the viscosity so the salt will not dissolve on contact.

Method: In a pot, bring 3 cups of liquid per cup of salt to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and simmer until reduced to a syrup thick enough to coat a spoon. Once the reduction starts to thicken, keep an eye on it as it can go from thick to burnt quickly. The amount of time it takes to create the reduction will depend on the liquid used and the size of the pot, estimate 15 to 20 minutes. Immediately add salt and stir. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently. You can also “heat dry” in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently, about every 15 to 30 minutes. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.

Flavor ideas: red wine, bourbon,whisky, scotch

Recipe: Red Wine Sea Salt

Uses: grilled meats, lamb, steak, dark chocolate (just a little)

Red Wine Sea Salt

Yield: 1 cup

Red Wine Sea Salt

Ingredients

  • 3 cups red wine
  • 1 cup coarse sea salt

Directions

  1. In a pot, bring wine to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and simmer until reduced to a syrup thick enough to coat a spoon. Once the reduction starts to thicken, keep an eye on it as it can go from thick to burnt quickly. The amount of time it takes to create the reduction will depend on the liquid used and the size of the pot, estimate 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Once reduced, immediately add salt and stir until the salt has completely absorbed the wine and has changed color. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently. You can also "heat dry" in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.
3.1
http://steelehousekitchen.com/homemade-flavored-salts

salt drying

dry method
This technique infuses salt with “dry” ingredients like herbs. A food processor is ideal but not necessary. Vegetables and fruits with low water content can be used as well.

Method: Combine ingredients in a food processor and pulse until all ingredients are of similar size and combined. The amount of ingredient to pair with the salt is based on your tastes; start with 1 teaspoon per 1/4 cup of salt and go from there. If you do not have a food processor, chop ingredient used for flavor as small as possible. Combine with salt in a bowl; stir and muddle (smash together) until well combined. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently. You can also “heat dry” in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.

Flavor ideas: rosemary and citrus, thyme, tea leaves and lavender, dried mushrooms and sage, dehydrated fruits, garlic, sundried tomatoes, citrus, lavender, chilies, combination of fresh herbs

Recipe: Rosemary Lemon Sea Salt

Uses: Roasted or baked chicken, grilled meats, ricotta cheese toasts, sliced tomatoes, fried foods, eggs

Rosemery Lemon Sea Salt

Yield: 1 cup

Rosemery Lemon Sea Salt

Ingredients

  • 1 cup coarse sea salt
  • 3 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves
  • Zest from one lemon, grated

Directions

  1. Combine ingredients in a food processor and pulse until all ingredients are of similar size and combined. If you do not have a food processor, chop ingredient used for flavor as small as possible. Combine with salt in a bowl; stir and muddle (smash together) until well combined.
  2. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently, about every 15 to 30 minutes. You can also "heat dry" in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently.
  3. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.
3.1
http://steelehousekitchen.com/homemade-flavored-salts

Homemade Flavored Finishing Salts - Perfect for holiday gifts!

wet method
This technique uses a thick “wet” flavoring such as condiments.

Method: Combine ingredients in a large bowl or food processor. The amount of ingredient to pair with the salt is based on your tastes; start with 1 tablespoon per 1/2 cup of salt and go from there. Stir (or pulse) until combined and salt has completely absorbed the flavoring and changed colors. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently. You can also “heat dry” in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.

Flavor ideas: Sriracha, mustard, hoisin sauce, chipotle/adobo sauce

Recipe: Sriracha Lime Salt

Uses: Fried foods, red meat, chicken, roasted or grilled vegetables, popcorn, grilled meats, rims of cocktail glasses, avocado toasts, sliced tomatoes, eggs

Sriracha Lime Salt

Sriracha Lime Salt

Ingredients

  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons (depending on desired heat level) Sriracha
  • Zest of 1 lime, grated

Directions

  1. Combine ingredients in a large bowl or food processor. Stir (or pulse) until combined and salt has completely absorbed the flavoring and changed colors. Pour onto a baking sheet or a piece of parchment paper and allow to air dry for 2 days, stirring frequently. You can also "heat dry" in the oven at 170°F or lower for 2 hours stirring frequently. Once dry, store in an air-tight container.
3.1
http://steelehousekitchen.com/homemade-flavored-salts

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45 Comments

I am so going to make the Sriracha Lime Salt for my husband for his January birthday! He is at work on December 31st and I am off so I know what I’ll be doing! Thanks for the awesome ideas.

Dear Meredith,
I am wishing a very Merry Christmas to you and your family. I have enjoyed your emails so much this year. I love your spirit. May God Bless You with His love and surround your like a blanket in His Love. Peace…Love…Joy!

I’m not sure if I’ve shared this with you or not but starting this fall I noticed that I could eat some vegetables now. No skins on the veggies mostly squashes and cauliflower (not the stem part)
I like to cook like you do. You are very clever at this cooking. It is a gift for you, Meredith. God Bless the Cook!!
Well, I just wanted to tell you after 3 1/2 yrs. finally I’m beginning to eat veggies. Not everyday though just sometimes. Peace.

Rose

Wow, how did you know I needed Christmas gifts for a few more hard-to-shop-for individuals?? I confess, I was skeptical that my salt wouldn’t completely dissolve when I poured it into my wine reduction, but it’s drying in the oven as I type this!

I think my next batch will be in a vinegar reduction for a relative who loves salt-and-vinegar flavoured things… and then maybe I’ll do a dill blend, because who doesn’t like dill?

I’m inspired! I’m a new homesteader living in a foreign country now, and I’m always eager to share new ideas with my friends and neighbors. This is going to make an excellent addition to our gift baskets.

I’m having a hard time drying the red wine salt. It’s the second day and I’ve heat dried it for over 2 hours. It’s still really moist. Any suggestions?

Because it’s so concentrated the natural sugars do make the red wine salt a little sticky but it should dry considerably. With anything that is dehydrated, the weather and amount of humidity in the air can affect the drying time. Hope that helps and thanks for asking

I’m making all of these right now as I speak. Does the Red Wine Version ever totally dry? I did 2 hours on 170 and air dry and still sticky?

Because it’s so concentrated the natural sugars do make the red wine salt a little sticky but it should dry considerably. With anything that is dehydrated, the weather and amount of humidity in the air can affect the drying time. Thanks for writing and hope you enjoy!

I see you use kosher salt for the Sriracha salt. Do you use coarse kosher salt or regular? I want to make this as a party favor and pack in pretty jars (maybe with a pack of microwave popcorn). Also think this would be fab to rim a bloody mary with.